Monday, October 1, 2012

Applied Kinesiology Research Published In The Past Year

 Two New Applied Kinesiology Textbooks (2nd Editions In Color!)
 

1)    Applied Kinesiology Essentials: The Missing Link in Healthcare significantly updates the scientific rationales and evidence-base for AK demonstrating -- in light of evidence based medicine -- the importance of the manual muscle test in physical, emotional, and nutritional diagnosis.  

2)   Applied Kinesiology: Clinical Techniques for Lower Body Dysfunctions presents a comprehensive “one-stop” textbook on the AK approach to lower body pain and dysfunction. This text provides a detailed, illustrated, and evidence-based discussion of the relationship between muscle weakness and lower body pain and dysfunction. It describes the normal anatomy and physiology as well as the most common disorders of the lower body. We believe it will be the most extensive work ever published on the manipulative approach to foot and ankle and peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes of the lower body.

 
Both of these books are available at
 


In the past year,
 the following research has been published by the International College of Applied Kinesiology

____________________________________________

Applied Kinesiology: Distinctions in its Definition and Interpretation, 2012.


Conservative Chiropractic Management of Urinary Incontinence Using Applied Kinesiology: A Retrospective Case-Series Report, 2012.


Physical causes of anxiety and sleep disorders: a case report, 2012.


A narrative review of manual muscle testing and implications for muscle testing research.


Association of manual muscle tests and mechanical neck pain: Results from a prospective pilot study, 2011.


Chiropractic management of a 30-year-old patient with Parsonage-Turner syndrome.



Conservative management of post-surgical urinary incontinence in an adolescent: A case history, 2011. 


Inter-Examiner Reliability of Manual Muscle Testing of Lower Limb Muscles without the Ideomotor Effect, 2011.




There are now more than
55 research articles on AK methods
Indexed on PubMed,
the highest rated evidence-base in the world


Dr. Goodheart's Legacy Is Up To Us!!

  

Saturday, August 11, 2012

BigPharma and the local opposition

Ask Dr. Scott – August 

Ask Dr. Scott – August


Ask Dr. Scott

Q: I am 65 years old and I was given a pain reliever by my doctor for my arthritis a few months ago, but this raised my blood pressure. At my next visit, I was prescribed several medicines for hypertension, which came with even more side effects and I feel even sorer than before. What can I do?

A: Prescription drugs are now marketed in every single corner of American society — from the Cartoon Network to nursing homes to the nightly news. Drug company advertisers apparently believe that Americans will swallow the panaceas offered in the six drug commercials that regularly accompany each evening’s news. Medicine ads sprout from magazines, billboards, scoreboards, racecars and more – the same places where cigarette ads of the 1960s and 1970s appeared.

Americans spent $320 billion on prescription drugs last year, more than they did on gasoline or fast food. They paid twice as much for their prescription medicine that year as they spent on either higher education or new automobiles. Americans spend more on medicines than do all the people of Japan, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina combined.

Almost 65% of the nation now takes drugs available only by prescription. Children line up at schools to get their daily doses. Pharmacies stay open 24-hours to meet our demand. In 2010 Walgreens opened drugstores in America at the rate of one every day. Dozens of supermarkets in Colorado have added a pharmacist and prescription counter, and pharmacies are routinely built inside the megastores of the nation like Wal-Mart, Target and Kmart.

The Center for Disease Control (2011) reports that 47.9% of Americans have used at least one prescription drug in the past month; another 21.4% use three or more prescription drugs in the past month, and finally another 10.5% use five or more prescription drugs in the past month.
When considering your own use of prescription drugs:

1) Unless causes of poor health and diminished function are dealt with, drugs will fail in the long run – even if they are used sensibly.

2) If the causes of your arthritis and hypertension lie in poor nutrition and diet, then “cure” lies in better eating and nutrition.

3) If problems emerge from a lack of exercise, then the “cure” lies in daily, pleasurable physical activity.

4) In the short term it may make sense to use drugs to save lives. But they must be used sensibly, cautiously, appropriately and not haphazardly and excessively as they are now.

5) Even when used correctly as instructed, prescription medications can cause serious long-term changes to occur that can be more devastating than the disease itself. A single class of new medicines promoted to treat irregular heartbeats (Tambocor® and Enkaid®) is estimated to have killed 50,000 Americans in just a few years. That tragedy in the 1980s showed that heavily marketed medicines could kill the equivalent of an entire city the size of Castle Rock with almost no public outcry if the drugs caused a type of death that was common in the population, like cardiac arrest. Remember the anti-inflammatory Vioxx®, estimated to have caused 139,000 heart attacks in which 30-40% of these patients died? More than 50 other drugs have been considered so dangerous they have had to be pulled from pharmacy shelves in past few decades alone.

6) Each of us has the power to decide whether to maintain healthy lifestyles, and each of us can, if we wish, undertake to incorporate health-enhancing practices, rather than disease-causing ones, into our daily life.

Dr. Scott Cuthbert is a chiropractor at Chiropractic Health Center in Pueblo, Colorado, as well as the author of two textbooks and multiple research articles. PuebloChiropracticCenter.com.

Sunday, May 27, 2012

George J. Goodheart, Jr. and John Diamond....and Dr. Sigmund Freud

Somatization – mind and muscles


John Diamond is a psychiatrist who, after he met Dr. Goodheart, became interested in the psychological and the psychiatric aspects of Applied Kinesiology, “as I realized it could give us instant access to the unconscious.” Just as Sigmund Freud (1900) revealed how dreams may prove to be a “royal road” to the unconscious mind, Dr. Diamond has shown how manual muscle testing during psychological questioning functions as another window to hidden motives and emotions. This is what makes Diamond’s work so congruent with psychoanalysis and applied kinesiology.
The principles of MMT developed in Applied Kinesiology were adapted by John Diamond in his book Behavioral Kinesiology, (Diamond, 2012, 1985, 1979) and form the basis of contemporary ‘energy psychology’, a popularized form of these psychosocial approaches that originated in Applied Kinesiology. Dr. Diamond has published significant amounts of theoretical and outcomes research related to the diagnosis (using the MMT) and treatment (using psychological, meridian, nutritional, homeopathic, and manual methods) of psychosocial disorders. A review of his writings and research should be made by anyone wishing to expand their knowledge in the area of psychosocial dysfunction. (Diamond, 2012, 1985, 1979)


John Diamond, MD and George J. Goodheart, Jr., DC
Founders of Behavioral and Applied Kinesiology

Dr. John Diamond was the first medical clinician-scientist in the psychological field to use and scientifically write about the meridian system’s influence on human psychological behavior and the link between the acupuncture meridians and emotions. Diamond is a psychiatrist and past president of the International Academy of Preventive Medicine, and was critical in bringing many leaders in the field of C.A.M. to Goodheart’s attention, as well as bringing Goodheart’s work to many leaders in the C.A.M. community. Diamond's pioneering concepts, together with some of the concepts developed by Goodheart in Applied Kinesiology, form the basis on which a new method of holistic psychology developed, and from his work the new field of “energy psychotherapy” emerged. (Diamond, 1985, 1979)
Dr. Goodheart said “Dr. John Diamond has been a friend and physician colleague for over thirty years. He alone deserves a Nobel Prize for his accurate observations on the acupuncture meridians and emotions.” From his initial work Dr. Diamond has spent 35 years developing methods of diagnosing and treating what he calls “The Acupuncture Emotional System”, associating the major positive and negative emotions with each meridian and thereby offering one possible pillar for psychosomatic medicine. In his view the acupuncture system is the communicating link between the emotions, the organs, and the muscles.

Dr. John Diamond demonstrates "psychological challenge" as used in AK
with his own manual muscle test
Diamond’s work also had a strong influence on the renowned osteopath Robert Fulford, D.O., with whom he corresponded. Fulford found Diamond’s book Life Energy essential, (1985) and his discussion of birth trauma were critical to Dr. Fulford's development of methods to release cranial injuries in children at birth. Diamond relates issues of fear, hate, and envy that may accompany the infant’s leaving the comfort of the womb. As a whole Diamond's work suggests that the body and the psyche progress in parallel during the developmental process, and that interventions aimed at improving the emotional-adaptive response to the birth experience and life traumas is fundamental for the patient's development and well-being.
Diamond was instrumental in the meetings between Dr. Goodheart and Dr. Willie May, and the salutary results from this interaction have been extensively published in the biomedical and chiropractic professions.

 
Diamond's philosophy of life as a healer
is an elegant guide to the life-of-the-spirit
that should be lived for physicians


In applied kinesiology and behavioral kinesiology,
the importance of the mental side of the triad of health
is never overlooked



A brief summary a few of the contributions of Dr. Diamond are as follows:

  • Dr. Diamond identified the links between specific meridians and emotions.
  • Dr. Diamond discovered how muscle testing of meridian, acupuncture, and alarm points could be used to identify the meridian imbalance underlying an emotional state.
  • Dr. Diamond discovered how meridian imbalance may occur in layers, and how these may correspond to layers of emotions. Thus, he used muscle testing to identify the sequence of meridians that required treatment in relation to a particular emotional problem. The complexity of the human psyche was found to be reflected in the complex adaptations made by the human muscle and meridian system.
  • Dr. Diamond suggested that manual muscle testing could be extended to exploring emotional truth, as well as the impact of all manner of mental stimuli upon the measurable human muscular system.
  • Dr. Diamond discovered how meridians that are out of balance may be corrected by specific affirmations.
  • Thus, Dr. Diamond discovered an efficient way of identifying how the meridian system is out of balance in relation to an emotional problem, fear or phobia, and how to correct this.
  • Dr. Diamond also identified profound obstacles to healing, such as the “reversal of the body’s morality” (what is called “psychological reversal” in AK).”
  • Diamond’s work led to profound elaborations on the use of the manual muscle test and AK approaches in the works of Roger Callahan (“Thought Field Therapy”), Gary Craig (“Emotional Freedom Techniques”), and many diverse but associated systems of treatment in the field of “energy psychology” and “kinesiology”.
Additionally, Dr. Diamond is a profound instructor on the usefulness of the arts to personal human development and healing.

His book on the poet William Blake is recommended.






“The most accurate diagnosing tool you can have is in your office -- YOUR PATIENT, with Innate intelligence the body language combined with muscle testing.” 
-- George J. Goodheart, Jr.

Selected from the
Textbooks Now Available For Sale at
 
https://www.thegangasaspress.com/:

2nd Editions  are now available
AT $30 OFF
IN COLOR!




 

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Drs. George J. Goodheart, Jr. and Leon Chaitow

A practicing naturopath, osteopath, and acupuncturist in the United Kingdom (now semi-retired and writing books in Corfu), with over forty years clinical experience, Dr. Chaitow is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. (Now the official journal of the International College of Applied Kinesiology)

Dr. Chaitow was invited to lecture to the ICAK USA in Detroit, 8 months before Dr. Goodheart passing in 2008.


Leon Chaitow, 2006


            In Chaitow’s books,  Goodheart’s and applied kinesiology’s methods are also seen as precursors to a “universal manipulative approach” that Chaitow suggests will cross professional boundaries and offer the safest and most versatile methodology for the treatment of patients with acute and chronic illness.

            In at least 5 of Dr. Chaitow’s books the work of Goodheart and applied kinesiology is presented and praised.

See three new Applied Kinesiology textbooks which bring AK into the era of Evidence-Based Medicine.
2nd Editions now available IN COLOR!


Saturday, January 21, 2012

Myofascial Trigger Points and Applied Kinesiology: Dr. George J. Goodheart, Jr., and Dr. Janet Travell Converge


 In March of 1978, Dr. George J. Goodheart, Jr., was a speaker with Dr. Janet Travell at the Rowe-Smith Memorial Seminar in San Antonio Texas.
In the Rowe Smith seminar both Drs. Travell and Goodheart were presented with a patient suffering temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The patient could open their mouth on a very limited basis. Dr. Travell treated the patient with spray-and-stretch techniques and helped him with pain reduction and mouth-opening (to the width of two fingers, with the accepted normal being three fingers of the non-dominant hand), but the patient’s mouth was still somewhat painful on opening. Dr. Travell then curtsy’d to Dr. Goodheart as though to say, “your turn.” Dr. Goodheart then treated the patient; after his AK assessment and treatment, the patient could open their mouth to the normal three-finger width and without pain.
Drs. Travell and Goodheart were then given strong applause from the crowd after their ministrations, with Dr. Travell and Goodheart offering a curtsy in unison to the gathered assembly of dentists.
Dr. Travell told the audience (mostly dentists) that she understood that Dr. Goodheart had found another method for the diagnosis of muscular dysfunctions and myofascial trigger points using the applied kinesiology manual muscle test method.
Drs. Masters and Shockley (dentists who organized the San Antonio meeting) congratulated Dr. Goodheart on his presentation with Dr. Travell at this seminar.

Letter congratulating Dr. Goodheart on his
presentation with Dr. Janet Travell

Dr. Janet Travell with her patient in the White House 
President John F. Kennedy

Myofascial trigger point (MTrP) weakness occurs when a muscle cannot fully activate all of its contractile fibers because of the presence of a trigger point. The importance of this observation, that motor dysfunction and particularly muscle inhibition are present in muscles housing MTrPs cannot be over-estimated. The weakness results from reflex motor inhibition and may occur without atrophy of the affected muscle, emphasizing Travell’s insight that the MTrP is directly influenced by the CNS and vice versa. A few investigators have reported on the effects of MTrPs on muscle activity using newer online computer analysis of EMG amplitudes. These reports indicate that MTrPs not only influence the muscle in which they reside, but that their influence can be transmitted through the CNS to other muscles. (Simons et al., 1999) According to Simons et al. (1999), “the motor effects of MTrPs may be the most important influence they exert, because the motor dysfunction they produce may result in overload of other muscles and spread the MTrP problem from muscle to muscle.”
For instance accelerated fatigability and significantly decreased median power frequency of the trapezius muscle with MTrPs has been demonstrated, compared to the contralateral muscle that was pain-free. (Hagberg & Kvarnstrom, 1984)
The weakness and loss of work tolerance in muscles with MTrPs are often interpreted by doctors, therapists and their patients to be an indication for increased exercise to correct the muscle impairment. However Simons et al (1999) warn, “If this is attempted without inactivating the responsible MTrPs, the exercise is likely to encourage and further ingrain substitution by other muscles with further weakening and deconditioning of the involved muscle.” Headley and Simons report muscle inhibition during movement when trigger points are present. (Headley, 1993; Simons, 1993) Headley illustrated two examples of movement-specific inhibition in which the muscle functioned well during isometric strength testing but did not contract at all during the movement for which it would normally serve as prime or synergistic mover. A frequently seen example is an anterior deltoid muscle that is strongly inhibited during shoulder flexion but is recruited essentially normally during shoulder abduction. The normal functional pattern returned with inactivation of the MTrP in the infraspinatus muscle. (Simons, 1993)
Mense & Simons (Mense & Simons, 2001) remark that for muscles accessible to palpation (many are not), a MTrP is consistently found within a palpable taut band. However, “It is difficult to measure with accuracy, specificity, and reliability. Several studies indicate that palpable taut bands can be present in normal muscles without any other indication of abnormality, such as tenderness or pain.” However, an active trigger point will inhibit the function of the muscle in which it is housed as well as those which lie in its target zone of referral. (Simons et al., 1999; Headley, 1993; Simons, 1993) For instance active MTrPs in the quadratus lumborum muscle have been shown to inhibit the gluteal muscles. (Headley, 1993)



After the detection of the muscle stretch reaction, a clinical decision might be made to treat the active trigger points found in the muscle as the primary treatment strategy. However, as Travell & Simons point out, (Travell & Simons, 1999) other dysfunctional features may be at work. Joint imbalances, biochemical, hormonal, dietary, or emotional imbalances might be the primary factors producing trigger point activity.  After the successful treatment of a local joint dysfunction, the aberrant behavior of local trigger points might resolve. On the other hand, MTrP deactivation may be a requirement for that treatment process to succeed. Resolution of most (sometimes all) of the perpetuating factors may be required to effectively treat chronicity in MTrP disorders.
According to Simons et al., (1999) the basic reason why therapy provides only temporary relief for MTrPs is because perpetuating factors have not been adequately addressed. Systemic perpetuating factors for MTrP problems encompass many conditions that compromise muscle energy metabolism. Travell & Simons (Travell & Simons, 1999, 1983) presented these metabolic, structural, and psychosocial factors in both editions of their classic textbook. Each of these factors of dysfunction has been given specific AK treatment approaches, making the comprehensive treatment of these “perpetuating factors” of MTrPs especially amenable to treatment using AK.

Drs. Goodheart and Travell’s
(AK and Myofascial Trigger Point)
Concepts Merge

Travell and Simons’ concepts regarding MTrPs have converged with applied kinesiology’s concept of the triad of health. The work of Raymond Nimmo, DC has worked in parallel with Travell and Goodheart in describing soft tissue changes that generate local and distant pain – myofascial trigger points. The evaluation of the multiplicity of factors that create and sustain MTrPs has been shown to be fundamental to successful treatment of this complex and widespread disorder. This convergence in many ways resembles the methods used in AK for spinal joint dysfunctions, neurolymphatic and neurovascular reflex stimulation, strain-counterstrain, fascial release, percussion, and nutritional evaluation and treatment. Possessed with a better understanding of the effect of MTrPs upon the function and strength of muscles, clinicians can expect that Travell and Simons’ approach will continue to influence AK methods and vice versa. 
With the complexity of the referred pain symptoms in the typical patient with MTrPs, as well as the complexity of the MTrP phenomena itself (central versus attachment MTrPs, active versus latent MTrPs, overlapping referred pain zones, etc.) the diagnosis of the presence and then the precise localization of the MTrP are expedited with the AK MMT. The MMT identifies the dysfunctional muscle housing the MTrP, and the process of therapy localization and/or challenge allows for the identification of the precise location of the trigger point that immediately improves the muscle stretch reaction and MMT finding.
After the detection of the muscle stretch reaction, a clinical decision might be made to treat the active trigger points found in the muscle as the primary treatment strategy. However, as Travell & Simons point out, (Travell & Simons, 1999) other dysfunctional features may be at work. Joint imbalances, biochemical, hormonal, dietary, or emotional imbalances might be the primary factors producing trigger point activity.  After the successful treatment of a local joint dysfunction, the aberrant behavior of local trigger points might resolve. On the other hand, MTrP deactivation may be a requirement for that treatment process to succeed. Resolution of most (sometimes all) of the perpetuating factors may be required to effectively treat chronicity in MTrP disorders.
According to Simons et al., (1999) the basic reason why therapy provides only temporary relief for MTrPs is because perpetuating factors have not been adequately addressed. Systemic perpetuating factors for MTrP problems encompass many conditions that compromise muscle energy metabolism. Travell & Simons (Travell & Simons, 1999, 1983) presented these metabolic, structural, and psychosocial factors in both editions of their classic textbook. Each of these factors of dysfunction has been given specific AK treatment approaches, making the comprehensive treatment of these “perpetuating factors” of MTrPs especially amenable to treatment using AK.





Travell and Simons’ concepts regarding MTrPs have converged with applied kinesiology’s concept of the triad of health. The evaluation of the multiplicity of factors that create and sustain MTrPs has been shown to be fundamental to successful treatment of this complex and widespread disorder. The respect and friendship between Drs. Goodheart and Travell will continue in the decades to come, with cooperative research and clinical patient care using the best-practices from both of these schools of thought for the evaluation and treatment of myofascial trigger points and muscle pain and dysfunction.

Dr. Travell's letter to Dr. Goodheart
Selected from three new textbooks on Applied Kinesiology, with 2nd Editions now in color!






Each of these books available in Europe at:
References:

·       Hagberg M, Kvarnström S. Muscular endurance and electromyographic fatigue in myofascial shoulder pain. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1984;65(9):522-5.

·       Headley BJ. Muscle inhibition. Physical Therapy Forum. 1993:24-26.

·       Mense S, Simons DG. Muscle Pain: Understanding Its Nature, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Philadelphia; 2001.

·       Simons D, Travell J, Simons L. Myofascial pain and dysfunction: The trigger point manual, Vol. 1: Upper half of the body, 2nd Ed. Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore; 1999.

·       Simons DG. Referred phenomena of myofascial trigger points. In: New Trends in Referred Pain and Hyperalgesia, Eds.  Vecchiet L, Albe-Fessard D, Lindlom U. Elsevier: Amsterdam; 1993.